Monthly Archives: May 2010

Trademark Infringement in Meta-tags

Website Meta tag Trademark Infringement

Businesses frequently compete for the best search engine positions.  Some may try to use a competitor’s name or the name of the competitor’s product as a website meta tag.  As your online trademark infringement lawyers, we provide you advice on how to protect your Intellectual Property against all Internet based trademark infringement, particularly trademark infringement arising from meta tag use.

Does the use of another’s trademark as a meta tag constitute trademark infringement?

A trademark infringement lawyer with our firm will assist you in evaluating the scenario to determine whether a use of a trademark in Internet meta-tags qualifies as trademark infringement and how to address this potential trademark infringement situation to properly protect your Intellectual Property rights. We expertly and diligently prosecute those who infringe on your trademarks online.

If you have been accused of Internet trademark infringement or if your website has been removed from search engine listings based on a claim of trademark infringement, we can assist you in protecting your rights against the claims asserted by a competitor, perhaps through a cease and desist letter from an intellectual property and trademark infringement attorney.

Virginia Computer Crimes Act

Virginia Computer Crimes Act

§ 18.2-152.3:1. Transmission of unsolicited bulk electronic mail; penalty.

A. Any person who:

1. Uses a computer or computer network with the intent to falsify or forge electronic mail transmission information or other routing information in any manner in connection with the transmission of unsolicited bulk electronic mail through or into the computer network of an electronic mail service provider or its subscribers; or

2. Knowingly sells, gives, or otherwise distributes or possesses with the intent to sell, give, or distribute software that (i) is primarily designed or produced for the purpose of facilitating or enabling the falsification of electronic mail transmission information or other routing information; (ii) has only limited commercially significant purpose or use other than to facilitate or enable the falsification of electronic mail transmission information or other routing information; or (iii) is marketed by that person acting alone or with another for use in facilitating or enabling the falsification of electronic mail transmission information or other routing information is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.

B. A person is guilty of a Class 6 felony if he commits a violation of subsection A and:

1. The volume of UBE transmitted exceeded 10,000 attempted recipients in any 24-hour period, 100,000 attempted recipients in any 30-day time period, or one million attempted recipients in any one-year time period; or

2. The revenue generated from a specific UBE transmission exceeded $1,000 or the total revenue generated from all UBE transmitted to any EMSP exceeded $50,000.

C. A person is guilty of a Class 6 felony if he knowingly hires, employs, uses, or permits any minor to assist in the transmission of UBE in violation of subdivision B 1 or subdivision B 2. *

18.2-152.3. COMPUTER fraud.

Any person who uses a COMPUTER or COMPUTER network without authority and with the intent to: 1. Obtain property or services by false pretenses; 2. Embezzle or commit larceny; or 3. Convert the property of another shall be guilty of the CRIME of COMPUTER fraud. If the value of the property or services obtained is $200 or more, the CRIME of COMPUTER fraud shall be punishable as a Class 5 felony. Where the value of the property or services obtained is less than $200, the CRIME of COMPUTER fraud shall be punishable as a Class 1 misdemeanor.

18.2-152.4. COMPUTER trespass; penalty.

Any person who uses a COMPUTER or COMPUTER network without authority and with the intent to: 1. Temporarily or permanently remove COMPUTER data, COMPUTER programs, or COMPUTER software from a COMPUTER or COMPUTER network; 2. Cause a COMPUTER to malfunction regardless of how long the malfunction persists; 3. Alter or erase any COMPUTER data, COMPUTER programs, or COMPUTER software; 4. Effect the creation or alteration of a financial instrument or of an electronic transfer of funds; 5. Cause physical injury to the property of another; or 6. Make or cause to be made an unauthorized copy, in any form, including, but not limited to, any printed or electronic form of COMPUTER data, COMPUTER programs, or COMPUTER software residing in, communicated by, or produced by a COMPUTER or COMPUTER network shall be guilty of the CRIME of COMPUTER trespass, which shall be punishable as a Class 1 misdemeanor. If such act is done maliciously and the value of the property damaged is $2,500 or more, the offense shall be punishable as a Class 6 felony.

18.2-152.5. COMPUTER invasion of privacy.

A. A person is guilty of the CRIME of COMPUTER invasion of privacy when he uses a COMPUTER or COMPUTER network and intentionally examines without authority any employment, salary, credit or any other financial or personal information relating to any other person. “Examination” under this section requires the offender to review the information relating to any other person after the time at which the offender knows or should know that he is without authority to view the information displayed. B. The CRIME of COMPUTER invasion of privacy shall be punishable as a Class 3 misdemeanor.

18.2-152.6. Theft of COMPUTER services.

Any person who willfully uses a COMPUTER or COMPUTER network, with intent to obtain COMPUTER services without authority, shall be guilty of the CRIME of theft of COMPUTER services, which shall be punishable as a Class 1 misdemeanor.

18.2-152.7. Personal trespass by COMPUTER.

A. A person is guilty of the CRIME of personal trespass by COMPUTER when he uses a COMPUTER or COMPUTER network without authority and with the intent to cause physical injury to an individual. B. If committed maliciously, the CRIME of personal trespass by COMPUTER shall be punishable as a Class 3 felony. If such act be done unlawfully but not maliciously, the CRIME of personal trespass by COMPUTER shall be punishable as a Class 1 misdemeanor.

18.2-152.8. Property capable of embezzlement.

For purposes of s 18.2-111, personal property subject to embezzlement shall include: 1. COMPUTERS and COMPUTER networks; 2. Financial instruments, COMPUTER data, COMPUTER programs, COMPUTER software and all other personal property regardless of whether they are: a. Tangible or intangible; b. In a format readable by humans or by a COMPUTER; c. In transit between COMPUTERS or within a COMPUTER network or between any devices which comprise a COMPUTER; or d. Located on any paper or in any device on which it is stored by a COMPUTER or by a human; and

3. COMPUTER services.

18.2-152.14. COMPUTER as instrument of forgery.

The creation, alteration, or deletion of any COMPUTER data contained in any COMPUTER or COMPUTER network, which if done on a tangible document or instrument would constitute forgery under Article 1 (s 18.2-168 et seq.) of Chapter 6 of this Title, will also be deemed to be forgery. The absence of a tangible writing directly created or altered by the offender shall not be a defense to any CRIME set forth in Article 1 (s 18.2-168 et seq.) of Chapter 6 of this Title if a creation, alteration, or deletion of COMPUTER data was involved in lieu of a tangible document or instrument.

UDRP

Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy

The Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy is overseen by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). The copyright to this work belongs exclusively to ICANN.  We claim no rights to ICANN works.

Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy

(As Approved by ICANN on October 24, 1999)

1. Purpose. This Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy (the “Policy”) has been adopted by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (“ICANN”), is incorporated by reference into your Registration Agreement, and sets forth the terms and conditions in connection with a dispute between you and any party other than us (the registrar) over the registration and use of an Internet domain name registered by you. Proceedings under Paragraph 4 of this Policy will be conducted according to the Rules for Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy (the “Rules of Procedure”), which are available at www.icann.org/udrp/udrp-rules-24oct99.htm, and the selected administrative-dispute-resolution service provider’s supplemental rules.

2. Your Representations. By applying to register a domain name, or by asking us to maintain or renew a domain name registration, you hereby represent and warrant to us that (a) the statements that you made in your Registration Agreement are complete and accurate; (b) to your knowledge, the registration of the domain name will not infringe upon or otherwise violate the rights of any third party; (c) you are not registering the domain name for an unlawful purpose; and (d) you will not knowingly use the domain name in violation of any applicable laws or regulations. It is your responsibility to determine whether your domain name registration infringes or violates someone else’s rights.

3. Cancellations, Transfers, and Changes. We will cancel, transfer or otherwise make changes to domain name registrations under the following circumstances:

a. subject to the provisions of Paragraph 8, our receipt of written or appropriate electronic instructions from you or your authorized agent to take such action;

b. our receipt of an order from a court or arbitral tribunal, in each case of competent jurisdiction, requiring such action; and/or

c. our receipt of a decision of an Administrative Panel requiring such action in any administrative proceeding to which you were a party and which was conducted under this Policy or a later version of this Policy adopted by ICANN. (See Paragraph 4(i) and (k) below.)

We may also cancel, transfer or otherwise make changes to a domain name registration in accordance with the terms of your Registration Agreement or other legal requirements.

4. Mandatory Administrative Proceeding.

This Paragraph sets forth the type of disputes for which you are required to submit to a mandatory administrative proceeding. These proceedings will be conducted before one of the administrative-dispute-resolution service providers listed at www.icann.org/udrp/approved-providers.htm (each, a “Provider”).

a. Applicable Disputes. You are required to submit to a mandatory administrative proceeding in the event that a third party (a “complainant”) asserts to the applicable Provider, in compliance with the Rules of Procedure, that

(i) your domain name is identical or confusingly similar to a trademark or service mark in which the complainant has rights; and

(ii) you have no rights or legitimate interests in respect of the domain name; and

(iii) your domain name has been registered and is being used in bad faith.

In the administrative proceeding, the complainant must prove that each of these three elements are present.

b. Evidence of Registration and Use in Bad Faith. For the purposes of Paragraph 4(a)(iii), the following circumstances, in particular but without limitation, if found by the Panel to be present, shall be evidence of the registration and use of a domain name in bad faith:

(i) circumstances indicating that you have registered or you have acquired the domain name primarily for the purpose of selling, renting, or otherwise transferring the domain name registration to the complainant who is the owner of the trademark or service mark or to a competitor of that complainant, for valuable consideration in excess of your documented out-of-pocket costs directly related to the domain name; or

(ii) you have registered the domain name in order to prevent the owner of the trademark or service mark from reflecting the mark in a corresponding domain name, provided that you have engaged in a pattern of such conduct; or

(iii) you have registered the domain name primarily for the purpose of disrupting the business of a competitor; or

(iv) by using the domain name, you have intentionally attempted to attract, for commercial gain, Internet users to your web site or other on-line location, by creating a likelihood of confusion with the complainant’s mark as to the source, sponsorship, affiliation, or endorsement of your web site or location or of a product or service on your web site or location.

c. How to Demonstrate Your Rights to and Legitimate Interests in the Domain Name in Responding to a Complaint. When you receive a complaint, you should refer to Paragraph 5 of the Rules of Procedure in determining how your response should be prepared. Any of the following circumstances, in particular but without limitation, if found by the Panel to be proved based on its evaluation of all evidence presented, shall demonstrate your rights or legitimate interests to the domain name for purposes of Paragraph 4(a)(ii):

(i) before any notice to you of the dispute, your use of, or demonstrable preparations to use, the domain name or a name corresponding to the domain name in connection with a bona fide offering of goods or services; or

(ii) you (as an individual, business, or other organization) have been commonly known by the domain name, even if you have acquired no trademark or service mark rights; or

(iii) you are making a legitimate noncommercial or fair use of the domain name, without intent for commercial gain to misleadingly divert consumers or to tarnish the trademark or service mark at issue.

d. Selection of Provider. The complainant shall select the Provider from among those approved by ICANN by submitting the complaint to that Provider. The selected Provider will administer the proceeding, except in cases of consolidation as described in Paragraph 4(f).

e. Initiation of Proceeding and Process and Appointment of Administrative Panel. The Rules of Procedure state the process for initiating and conducting a proceeding and for appointing the panel that will decide the dispute (the “Administrative Panel”).

f. Consolidation. In the event of multiple disputes between you and a complainant, either you or the complainant may petition to consolidate the disputes before a single Administrative Panel. This petition shall be made to the first Administrative Panel appointed to hear a pending dispute between the parties. This Administrative Panel may consolidate before it any or all such disputes in its sole discretion, provided that the disputes being consolidated are governed by this Policy or a later version of this Policy adopted by ICANN.

g. Fees. All fees charged by a Provider in connection with any dispute before an Administrative Panel pursuant to this Policy shall be paid by the complainant, except in cases where you elect to expand the Administrative Panel from one to three panelists as provided in Paragraph 5(b)(iv) of the Rules of Procedure, in which case all fees will be split evenly by you and the complainant.

h. Our Involvement in Administrative Proceedings. We do not, and will not, participate in the administration or conduct of any proceeding before an Administrative Panel. In addition, we will not be liable as a result of any decisions rendered by the Administrative Panel.

i. Remedies. The remedies available to a complainant pursuant to any proceeding before an Administrative Panel shall be limited to requiring the cancellation of your domain name or the transfer of your domain name registration to the complainant.

j. Notification and Publication. The Provider shall notify us of any decision made by an Administrative Panel with respect to a domain name you have registered with us. All decisions under this Policy will be published in full over the Internet, except when an Administrative Panel determines in an exceptional case to redact portions of its decision.

k. Availability of Court Proceedings. The mandatory administrative proceeding requirements set forth in Paragraph 4 shall not prevent either you or the complainant from submitting the dispute to a court of competent jurisdiction for independent resolution before such mandatory administrative proceeding is commenced or after such proceeding is concluded. If an Administrative Panel decides that your domain name registration should be canceled or transferred, we will wait ten (10) business days (as observed in the location of our principal office) after we are informed by the applicable Provider of the Administrative Panel’s decision before implementing that decision. We will then implement the decision unless we have received from you during that ten (10) business day period official documentation (such as a copy of a complaint, file-stamped by the clerk of the court) that you have commenced a lawsuit against the complainant in a jurisdiction to which the complainant has submitted under Paragraph 3(b)(xiii) of the Rules of Procedure. (In general, that jurisdiction is either the location of our principal office or of your address as shown in our Whois database. See Paragraphs 1 and 3(b)(xiii) of the Rules of Procedure for details.) If we receive such documentation within the ten (10) business day period, we will not implement the Administrative Panel’s decision, and we will take no further action, until we receive (i) evidence satisfactory to us of a resolution between the parties; (ii) evidence satisfactory to us that your lawsuit has been dismissed or withdrawn; or (iii) a copy of an order from such court dismissing your lawsuit or ordering that you do not have the right to continue to use your domain name.

5. All Other Disputes and Litigation. All other disputes between you and any party other than us regarding your domain name registration that are not brought pursuant to the mandatory administrative proceeding provisions of Paragraph 4 shall be resolved between you and such other party through any court, arbitration or other proceeding that may be available.

6. Our Involvement in Disputes. We will not participate in any way in any dispute between you and any party other than us regarding the registration and use of your domain name. You shall not name us as a party or otherwise include us in any such proceeding. In the event that we are named as a party in any such proceeding, we reserve the right to raise any and all defenses deemed appropriate, and to take any other action necessary to defend ourselves.

7. Maintaining the Status Quo. We will not cancel, transfer, activate, deactivate, or otherwise change the status of any domain name registration under this Policy except as provided in Paragraph 3 above.

8. Transfers During a Dispute.

a. Transfers of a Domain Name to a New Holder. You may not transfer your domain name registration to another holder (i) during a pending administrative proceeding brought pursuant to Paragraph 4 or for a period of fifteen (15) business days (as observed in the location of our principal place of business) after such proceeding is concluded; or (ii) during a pending court proceeding or arbitration commenced regarding your domain name unless the party to whom the domain name registration is being transferred agrees, in writing, to be bound by the decision of the court or arbitrator. We reserve the right to cancel any transfer of a domain name registration to another holder that is made in violation of this subparagraph.

b. Changing Registrars. You may not transfer your domain name registration to another registrar during a pending administrative proceeding brought pursuant to Paragraph 4 or for a period of fifteen (15) business days (as observed in the location of our principal place of business) after such proceeding is concluded. You may transfer administration of your domain name registration to another registrar during a pending court action or arbitration, provided that the domain name you have registered with us shall continue to be subject to the proceedings commenced against you in accordance with the terms of this Policy. In the event that you transfer a domain name registration to us during the pendency of a court action or arbitration, such dispute shall remain subject to the domain name dispute policy of the registrar from which the domain name registration was transferred.

9. Policy Modifications. We reserve the right to modify this Policy at any time with the permission of ICANN. We will post our revised Policy at <URL> at least thirty (30) calendar days before it becomes effective. Unless this Policy has already been invoked by the submission of a complaint to a Provider, in which event the version of the Policy in effect at the time it was invoked will apply to you until the dispute is over, all such changes will be binding upon you with respect to any domain name registration dispute, whether the dispute arose before, on or after the effective date of our change. In the event that you object to a change in this Policy, your sole remedy is to cancel your domain name registration with us, provided that you will not be entitled to a refund of any fees you paid to us. The revised Policy will apply to you until you cancel your domain name registration.

Communications Decency Act -Sec. 230

The Communications Decency Act

§230. Protection for private blocking and screening of offensive material

(a) Findings

The Congress finds the following:

(1) The rapidly developing array of Internet and other interactive computer services available to individual Americans represent an extraordinary advance in the availability of educational and informational resources to our citizens.

(2) These services offer users a great degree of control over the information that they receive, as well as the potential for even greater control in the future as technology develops.

(3) The Internet and other interactive computer services offer a forum for a true diversity of political discourse, unique opportunities for cultural development, and myriad avenues for intellectual activity.

(4) The Internet and other interactive computer services have flourished, to the benefit of all Americans, with a minimum of government regulation.

(5) Increasingly Americans are relying on interactive media for a variety of political, educational, cultural, and entertainment services.

(b) Policy

It is the policy of the United States —

(1) to promote the continued development of the Internet and other interactive computer services and other interactive media;

(2) to preserve the vibrant and competitive free market that presently exists for the Internet and other interactive computer services, unfettered by Federal or State regulation;

(3) to encourage the development of technologies which maximize user control over what information is received by individuals, families, and schools who use the Internet and other interactive computer services;

(4) to remove disincentives for the development and utilization of blocking and filtering technologies that empower parents to restrict their children’s access to objectionable or inappropriate online material; and

(5) to ensure vigorous enforcement of Federal criminal laws to deter and punish trafficking in obscenity, stalking, and harassment by means of computer.

(c) Protection for “good samaritan” blocking and screening of offensive material

(1) Treatment of publisher or speaker

No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider.

(2) Civil Liability

No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be held liable on account of —

(A) any action voluntarily taken in good faith to restrict access to or availability of material that the provider or user considers to be obscene, lewd, lascivious, filthy, excessively violent, harassing, or otherwise objectionable, whether or not such material is constitutionally protected; or

(B) any action taken to enable or make available to information content providers or others the technical means to restrict access to material described in paragraph (1).

(d) Obligations of interactive computer service

A provider of interactive computer service shall, at the time of entering an agreement with a customer for the provision of interactive computer service and in a manner deemed appropriate by the provider, notify such customer that parental control protections (such as computer hardware, software, or filtering services) are commercially available that may assist the customer in limiting access to material that is harmful to minors. Such notice shall identify, or provide the customer with access to information identifying current providers of such protections.

(e) Effect on other laws

(1) No effect on criminal law

Nothing in this section shall be construed to impair the enforcement of section 223 or 231 of this title, chapter 71 (relating to obscenity) or 110 (relating to sexual exploitation of children) of Title 18, or any other Federal criminal statute.

(2) No effect on intellectual property law

Nothing in this section shall be construed to limit or expand any law pertaining to intellectual property.

(3) State law

Nothing in this section shall be construed to prevent any State from enforcing any State law that is consistent with this section. No cause of action may be brought and no liability may be imposed under any state or local law that is inconsistent with this section.

(4) No Effect on Communications Privacy law

Nothing in this section shall be construed to limit the application of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 or any of the amendments made by such Act, or any similar State law.

(f) Definitions

As used in this section:

(1) Internet

The term “Internet” means the international computer network of both Federal and non-Federal interoperable packet switched data networks.

(2) Interactive computer service

The term “interactive computer service” means any information service, system, or access software provider that provides or enables computer access by multiple users to a computer server including specifically a service or system that provides access to the Internet and such systems operated or services offered by libraries or educational institutions.

(3) Information content provider

The term “information content provider” means any person or entity that is responsible, in whole or in part, for the creation or development of information provided through the Internet or any other interactive computer service.

(4) Access software provider

The term “access software provider” means a provider of software (including client or server software), or enabling tools that do any one or more of the following:

(A) filter, screen, allow, or disallow content;

(B) pick, choose, analyze, or digest content; or

(C) transmit, receive, display, forward, cache, search, subset, organize, reorganize, or translate content

Internet Solicitation of Minor

Internet  Solicitation of a Minor

Internet solicitation of a minor is widely prosecuted Nationwide.  Our attorneys defend against charges of Internet solicitation of a minor in Virginia and Nationwide, when requested by our clients. State and local Police Departments have created departments dedicated to Internet solicitation of a minor.  Often is that case that a person will be in a chat room and someone claiming to be a minor will initiate engage in chat with an adult about sexual topics.  This “minor” is usually a Police Officer with the Internet child solicitation task force.

Many times the person chatting with this Police Officer posing as a “minor” never had the intention to actually meet the “minor.”  It is always important to ask whether the person actually went to meet the minor, the age representations that were made, and the methods used to collect and manipulate the evidence.

However, regardless of whether the meeting takes place, felony charges will most certainly be brought. At this point, an attorney with experience in defending these type of criminal accusations as well as in-depth technical knowledge of the Internet, can provide a competent defense against Internet solicitation of a minor charges.

Many well-reputed and experienced criminal defense lawyers may venture into this area of law just to find themselves overpowered and overwhelmed by a highly-trained, highly-experience prosecution team.  Our attorneys include a former computer engineer experiences in the IT side of the equation,  as well as aggressive criminal defense lawyers.  Contact us to see what we can do to defend your case.

Internet Lawyer New Website

We are in the process of updating the Internet Lawyer website.  The website was a bit dated and in desperate need of a “facelift.”  We have updated the appearance and will be updating the contents to better reflect the current state of our practice.  This has been a very successful year for our Internet Law practice, and hopefully the new website will better reflect our image.  During that time, some of the urls in the Internet Lawyer website may still resolve to the old pages.  I am aware that this has caused some confusion for some of our existing and potential clients, but it will be resolved soon.   We are going through the same process with our Cyber Crime Defense website.  This one is almost done, but some urls still need to be fixed.

We will continue updating the website in a manner that will hopefully reduce any confusion.  This has been a great year for our Internet Law firm.  We became the first law firm in the United States to win a jury trial in Federal Court involving accusations of criminal copyright infringement (music piracy).  This was also the most important case of its type.  Our client was alleged to be the leader of the most prolific music piracy group in the world.  After five days of trial, the jury agreed with us and returned a Not Guilty verdict.

Internet Trial Attorney

An Internet Law pioneer with a proven record, Domingo J. Rivera was the first attorney in the United States to win a complex jury trial involving Federal Copyright Infringement, music piracy criminal allegations.

The importance of having a computer expert as your Internet trial attorney

During a cyber trial, whether related to copyright infringement, trademark infringement, domain name dispute, Internet defamation, or a computer crime trial, it is extremely important to have an attorney who has not only legal subject matter knowledge, but is also experienced in computer technology and the technical concepts related to the Internet.  We recently completed a long and complex cyber crime trial. We were fully equipped to expertly handle the criminal defense aspects of the case, we knew the law, how to cross-examine witnesses, and how to establish reasonable doubt. However, during the trial, it was our technical knowledge that allowed us to provide a unique perspective to the evidence presented.

The evidence presented at trial contained technical details that only an attorney with Internet technology knowledge would have recognized.  Your Internet lawyer must not only be effective in arguing Internet law, but must have superior technical knowledge to recognize complex technical issues “on the spot.”

It takes a lot of finesse, patience, and competence to explain to effectively explain technical issues to the court. The typical non-technical attorney attempting to venture into Internet law may not understanding these technical concepts.  Our expertise includes technical degrees in Computer Engineering and years of Internet technology experience.

Contact an Internet lawyer

Cease and Desist Letter

Cease and Desist Notice

You may need an Internet lawyer to assist you with the preparation of a cease and desist letter when your business is the victim of Internet copyright infringement, Internet trademark infringement, Internet defamation, domain name legal issues, or other Internet law issues.

Your Internet business may need an effective cease and desist letter to prevent your competitors from copying the contents of your website in order to take advantage of the success of your online business…. or you may have received an Internet copyright infringement cease and desist notice from an Internet copyright infringement lawyer or Internet trademark infringement lawyer asking you for a significant amount of monetary damages. In addition the copyright infringement cease and desist notice written may contain threats indicating that your company will be the target of a copyright infringement lawsuit, and an injunction against Internet copyright infringement.  Our Internet lawyers can provide assistance in drafting an effective cease and desist notice or responding to a cease and desist notice.

Effective handling of the cease and desist letter may determine whether or not expensive court litigation will be necessary to resolve the legal dispute.

Contact an Internet Lawyer

Trademark

Trademark

A Trademark identifies your company’s goods from the goods of your competitors or other third parties. Trademark Registration allows you to keep your competitors from using your company or product name, symbol or design.

When you register a Trademark, you are legally presumed to be the owner of the mark and you can stop others from using a name that is confusingly similar to your trademark. Additionally, registration of your Trademark allows you to obtain up to three times the amount of your losses if you have to sue for infringement of your registered Trademark.  However, registration is not required in order for you to be able to maintain a cause of action for trademark infringement.

Internet trademark infringement occurs frequently in domain name registration, meta tags, and keyword search advertising. As your cyber trademark lawyer, we provide you advice on how to protect your trademark rights against Internet trademark infringement.  Some instances of Internet trademark infringement include:

Trademark Infringement in Domain Names, Cybersquatting, and Cyber-piracy

Trademark Infringement in Meta Tags

Trademark Infringement in Keyword Search Advertising

We are your Internet trademark infringement attorney, Internet trademark lawyer, Cybersquatting legal counsel, cyber-piracy legal adviser and trademark law professional.

Copyright

Copyright

A copyright is the legal protection for the artistic and literary work that you create. Copyrightable items include music, books, websites, graphics, poetry, stories, and software. Your copyrighted works may not be copied, reproduced, distributed or displayed without your consent.

Registration, although not required is advisable and important if you wish to protect your work. Copyright registration provides significant benefits, including evidence that you created your own works. It is significantly more difficult to maintain a legal action for copyright infringement when you have not obtained a copyright registration for your works and have to prove to a court that you actually created your own work.

Additionally, there are advantages in case you are faced with litigation. For example, if you are forced into litigation to protect your copyright rights, a court may award significant damages for copyright infringement, including statutory damages of up to $150,000, and reimbursement for your attorney’s fees and costs for the infringement of your copyright rights.  However, under U.S. Copyright Laws, you obtain a copyright to your works the moment your works are created and registration is not required to maintain a cause of action for trademark infringement.  If your copyright is not registered, you will need to prove actual damages, as opposed to the presumed statutory damages provided for works protected by a registered copyright.

Even if your website is not registered, your content is still protected under U.S. Copyright Laws and you can maintain an action for Internet copyright infringement. As you Internet copyright infringement attorney, we understand Internet copyright laws,  U.S. Copyright Act, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) and the application of copyright laws to Internet copyright matters.